JOEL SCHUMACHER FILMMAKER  DIES AT 80

Joel T. Schumacher was an American filmmaker. The films that made him famous were after directing three hit films: St. Elmo’s Fire (1985), The Lost Boys (1987), and Flatliners (1990). He later went on to direct the John Grisham adaptations The Client (1994) and A Time to Kill (1996). His films Falling Down (1993) and 8mm (1999) competed for Palme d’Or and Golden Bear, respectively.

In 1993, he signed on to direct the next instalments of the Batman film series, Batman Forever (1995) and Batman & Robin (1997).

After the Batman films, Schumacher pulled back from blockbusters and returned to making minimalist films such as Tigerland (2000) and Phone Booth (2002), with Colin Farrell and Kiefer Sutherland where trapped Farrell’s antihero in the title New York City phone booth for almost all of the film’s running time and worked intrigue when this come out.

Also “Bad Company,” starring Anthony Hopkins and Chris Rock; “Veronica Guerin,” starring Cate Blanchett as a journalist crusading rather recklessly against the Irish drug trade; and Jim Carrey thriller “The Number 23” and “Trespass,” starring Nicolas Cage and Nicole Kidman and he also directed The Phantom of the Opera (2004), The Number(2007).

Schumacher was born in New York City, and was first up to have studied at Parsons the New School of Design and the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York. He worked in the fashion industry but decided to instead pursue a career in filmmaking. After a move to Los Angeles, he applied his fashion background to working first as a costume designer and worked in TV while earning an MFA from UCLA.

Schumacher also directed a couple of episodes of “House of Cards” in 2013, and in 2015 he exec produced the series “Do Not Disturb: Hotel Horrors.”

Camerimage, the International Film Festival of the Art of Cinematography, awarded Schumacher a special award in 2010. He also received the Distinguished Collaborator Award at the Costume Designers Guild Awards in 2011.

Tributes are flowing in from fellow filmmakers as to his legacy.

RIP to another great filmmaker of our generation.

PHOTO ARE CREDITED TO NEW YORK FILM ACADEMY.

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